back to blog

Benefits of Root Vegetables

Benefits of Root Vegetables

Full of Nutrients

People often pass on root vegetables thinking the category is reserved for starchy, high-calorie foods. That is rarely the case and these delicious options are proof of the wide variety of nutrients root vegetables supply.

Jicama is a crisp and refreshing vegetable that is rich in fiber and vitamin C. It is often eaten raw, which helps to preserve its valuable vitamin C content.

Kohlrabi is a cruciferous vegetable that provides the same glucosinolates more commonly associated with broccoli and cauliflower. Glucosinolates have been found to protect against cancer.

Radishes are a crunchy, spicy root vegetable that are rich in vitamin C. Like jicama, they are often eaten raw, preserving the vitamin content.

Rutabaga is often described as a sweeter, denser version of a turnip. It provides fiber, potassium, vitamin A, and vitamin C.

Parsnips have a similar shape and texture to carrots. They are a source for fiber, folate, and manganese.

Winter Access and Long Storage

As the temperatures drop in fall and winter, the availability of fresh foods can become limited. Root vegetables are an ideal option to keep your intake of fresh, nutritious produce going year round. Most varieties also have an extended storage life, making it easy to stock up so that you can use them throughout the season. Root vegetables are best stored at 50 degrees Fahrenheit in a space with controlled humidity, such as a root cellar, garage or basement.

Easy to Cook

Jicama and radishes have a crisp texture that is delicious when eaten raw. Try slicing them to top fresh salads or shred to add to slaw. When sliced thick or cut into sticks, they also make good dippers for salsa, guacamole, and hummus.

Root vegetables like kohlrabi, rutabaga, and parsnips get sweeter when they are cooked. Chop them into equal pieces, toss with olive oil and spices and roast at 400 degrees Fahrenheit for 30 to 40 minutes, or until tender. Another option is to shred them and stir them into muffin and cake batters before baking. They can also be steamed until soft and then pureed into a mashed side dish.

How to Host a Healthy Game Day Party

Healthy Game Day Party

As fall approaches, so do game day celebrations with friends and family. Many of these events are centered around food, but that doesn't mean that they have to be unhealthy. By making minor changes to your menu, you can host a healthy game day party without the extra calories.

Make it a meal

Setting out a spread of snacks often means munching on high calorie foods throughout the duration of the game. Try serving a full meal instead. This will encourage you to eat at only one point during the party and prevent mindless snacking. Invite guests to fill their plates at the start of the game or enjoy the meal during halftime.

Create a healthy DIY buffet

Turning a meal of tacos or soup into a self-serve buffet is a great way to stick to healthy options. For tacos, provide hard shells and soft tortillas as well as lettuce for those who want a salad. Beans, brown rice, poultry, diced tomato, fresh salsa, guacamole, and hot sauce are all healthy fillings that will allow guests to create their own meal. For a soup buffet, set up slow cookers filled with chicken tortilla soup, black bean soup, and chili made with lean ground turkey. Whole grain croutons and crackers, fresh herbs, salsa, chopped avocado, diced onion, and chopped black olives are a few examples of delicious and nutritious toppings.

Limit the options

The larger the variety of foods available, the greater the chance that you will eat more. If you serve appetizers and snacks, limit them to three or four healthy choices. Create mini salads or a soup that can be sipped from a cup. Fire up the grill for chicken satay or shrimp skewers. Serve a healthy bean dip or fresh salsa with chopped vegetables. If there are only a few foods to try, you’ll be less likely to overload your plate and consume more food than you need to feel full.

Keep the food in the kitchen

Avoid leaving snack foods out on the coffee table within easy reach. Set up a buffet of foods near the kitchen and provide plates to encourage everyone to fill their plates and take them back to the television. Keeping the food out of reach will make everyone less likely to engage in mindless snacking throughout the party.

Dress up low calorie drinks

Avoiding alcohol and sodas will save you hundreds of calories. Add some flavorful twists to lower calorie drinks so that you don’t feel deprived. Serve club soda with shots of 100 percent fruit juice or cider. Make up a few pitchers of water that have been filled with cucumber or citrus slices and chilled. Serve unsweetened flavored teas like orange or Chai over ice. Sipping these low calorie drinks during the party will keep you occupied, which may reduce the urge to grab more snacks.

Portion Control for Weight Loss

Portion Control for Weight Loss

Portion control is the key to reaching your weight loss goals. Understanding more about healthy serving sizes and reducing portions to meet these recommendations provides a way to satisfy cravings while sticking to your nutritious eating plan.

Portions versus serving sizes

A serving size and a portion are not always the same thing. A serving is a healthy amount of a food recommended by health professionals, and a term used by food manufacturers as a base for determining nutritional information. A portion is how much food you serve yourself. A healthy goal is to reduce your portion sizes so that they more closely align with what health professionals consider to be an appropriate serving. For example, according to the Dietary Guidelines for Americans, one serving of grains is one slice of bread or a half-cup of pasta.

Gaining control of portion sizes doesn’t mean you have to carry around measuring cups. These tools can be helpful in your own kitchen, but you can also make yourself familiar with common objects and how they compare to appropriate serving sizes to make healthy eating easier.

Reduced portions and total calories

Regardless of the food, the more you eat of it, the more calories you consume. By simply reducing portion sizes, you can create the negative calorie balance necessary to initiate weight loss. Choosing nutritious foods is still an essential part of improving your health, but reducing portion sizes allows you to include your favorite treats while still losing weight. Choosing a mini cupcake over a full size dessert, or adding a half-cup of whole wheat pasta as a side instead of a main course are ways you can satisfy cravings without consuming excess calories.

Portion control and fullness

Research shows that the more food people are served, the more they eat. As a result, large portions, like those served in restaurants, cause people to eat much more food than they need. It takes time to get back in touch with hunger cues and to recognize true hunger and fullness. As you gradually decrease portions, you will begin to feel full after eating much less food. As a result, your calorie intake will decrease and you will be on your way to reaching your goal weight.

Spices that Improve Health

Spices that Improve Health

Adding spices to your food allows you to enhance flavor without using excess salt and fats, but the benefits don’t stop there. Research shows that spices contain substances that fight disease and improve your health.

Cinnamon

Research shows that cinnamon can improve blood sugar by stimulating insulin receptors and improving glucose absorption by cells. Some studies suggest that it may help lower blood sugar in those with diabetes. The oils in cinnamon have also been found to help fight bacteria. Add cinnamon to your morning coffee, stir it into yogurt or oatmeal, and sprinkle it over fruit salad.

Coriander

The oil in coriander seeds has antibacterial properties that may be effective at destroying dangerous bacteria that cause foodborne illness. It is also full of multiple phytonutrients. Animal studies have linked coriander with reduced blood sugar and cholesterol. Sprinkle coriander in scrambled egg whites, add it to salad dressings, or mix it into soups and stews.

Crushed Red Pepper

Peppers contain capsaicin, which contributes to the spicy heat. Capsaicin is also responsible for many of the health benefits of hot peppers. Hot peppers have been found to produce a slight increase in metabolism and a brief reduction in appetite that may help with weight loss over time. Studies also show that hot peppers may reduce blood cholesterol, and they are linked to lower risks for heart attack and stroke. Stir crushed red pepper into soups or pasta sauces, and sprinkle it over roasted vegetables.

Ginger

Gingerol is responsible for the many health benefits of ginger. Ginger has been found to fight inflammation, which may help reduce arthritis pain. Research shows that it may also help protect against some cancers by blocking the growth of cancer cells. While fresh ginger contains more gingerol, dried ginger is still a healthy spice. Blend it into smoothies, stir it into oatmeal, and add it to sauteed vegetables.

Turmeric

Turmeric is a spice often found in curry powder as well as yellow mustard. It contains the antioxidant curcumin, which is responsible for its multiple health benefits. Turmeric has been found to reduce joint inflammation. Research shows that it may also help block the growth of cancer cells. The antioxidant power of turmeric has been found to reduce total cholesterol, which may lead to a reduced risk for heart disease. Blend turmeric into smoothies, add it to stir-fries,and mix it into dry rubs for poultry or fish.

7 Tips for a Healthier Happy Hour

Tips for a Healthier Happy Hour

Living a healthy lifestyle doesn't mean that you have to cut out all special occasions. It’s okay to responsibly enjoy happy hour with friends and coworkers from time to time. When you do, aim to make it a healthier event so that it doesn't throw you off track. Here are a few ways you can join the fun without disrupting your progress.

Know the facts.

Before you decide to gather for a drink, it’s important to understand how alcohol impacts weight loss. Not only do alcoholic drinks add calories, they can affect how efficiently you burn body fat and they can also stimulate appetite. Understanding how alcohol can interfere with reaching your goals will help you make healthier choices and prevent the risk that you will overdo it on drinks.

Order a classic.

Fruity and frozen drinks or those mixed with regular soda cause calories and simple sugars to add up. If you want a cocktail, stick with the classics. Traditional daiquiris, martinis, and spirits mixed with club soda allow for a cocktail without the cost of blowing your daily calorie budget. Order a classic martini instead of a cosmopolitan and you will save 70 calories or more.

Stick with smaller portions.

Many craft breweries and tasting rooms provide options for smaller portions that can help you stick to your plan. Order a half pint or tasters of beers for less volume and fewer calories.

Seek out session beers.

It is difficult to estimate the calories in a beer without knowing the exact recipe, but generally when the alcohol content goes up so do the number of calories. Fortunately, session beers provide a lighter option. Session beers are less than 5 percent ABV (alcohol by volume). As a comparison, a 12 ounce Budweiser is 5 percent ABV and contains about 145 calories.

Pick wine over sangria.

Stick with plain wine instead of sangria. A five-ounce glass of Merlot contains about 115 calories. Sangria is made with wine, but many varieties have added fruit juice, syrups, liqueurs, and some even contain flavored sodas like ginger ale. All these additions cause the calories to soar to over 200 for one glass.

Work in water.

Alcohol is dehydrating so keep your water intake up even if you only have one drink. Drink a glass of water before and after your cocktail. Dehydration can zap your energy levels making you feel sluggish and unmotivated for tomorrow morning’s workout.

Select the snacks.

Consuming alcohol lowers inhibitions making it much easier to engage in mindless snacking. If your table decides to order a few bar bites, take charge of the situation and order some healthier items. Check for options like grilled chicken satay, sautéed shrimp, or lettuce wraps. If none of the offerings meet your healthy eating plan, order a side salad or a cup of broth-based soup. Ignoring your hunger will only make you cave in when the high-calorie appetizers get passed around the table.

MyFoodDiary.com - Calorie counting made easy
About MyFoodDiary

MyFoodDiary makes counting calories easy. Search from over 80,000 foods.

Learn More
Follow Us on the Web f Facebook
P Pinterest
t Twitter
G+ Google+

RSS Feed

Categories Exercise
Lifestyle
MyFoodDiary
Nutrition
Recipes
Weight Loss